Your Football Team, Your Eating Habits


Over at MIC, I spoke with Pierre Chandon, who along with Yann Cornil, conducted a research study last year about NFL fans, and how their eating habits change when their team win versus when their team loses on Sunday. 
The findings are interesting and I outlined them in-depth and got to ask Chandon a few follow-up questions. 
You can read the entire piece here. An excerpt is below.

Last year, Pierre Chandon, a L’Oréal chaired professor of marketing, innovation and creativity at INSEAD in France, and Yann Cornil, a doctoral student, conducted a study examining exactly that: the correlation of eating habits with the result of your favorite football team on any given Sunday.
The results showed that watching your team suffer defeat does indeed turn you into an unhealthier eater than if you had watched your team win.
"For many people, being a supporter of a football team is an important part of their identity. In fact, fans don’t say ‘they lost’ or ‘they won’ but ‘we lost’ or ‘we won.’ When our favorite team win, we feel good, we feel strong, and it’s easier to make healthier food choices," Chandon told Mic in a phone interview. “It’s a bit like when we are in love, we are no longer that hungry. When our team loses however, we feel weak, and it becomes more difficult to resist the comfort of indulgent food.”
The study looked at two seasons’ worth of NFL games and the consumption habits of people in the 30 NFL cities in North America. The results were compared against control groups, people in cities where matches did not take place on the same day or people who did not have a home NFL team to root for. On average, Americans eat 16% more saturated fat and 10% more calories the day after their NFL team suffers a loss. In contrast, the day after a team wins, its fans ate 9% less saturated fat and 5% fewer calories. The results were consistent across genders.

Your Football Team, Your Eating Habits

Over at MIC, I spoke with Pierre Chandon, who along with Yann Cornil, conducted a research study last year about NFL fans, and how their eating habits change when their team win versus when their team loses on Sunday. 

The findings are interesting and I outlined them in-depth and got to ask Chandon a few follow-up questions. 

You can read the entire piece here. An excerpt is below.

Last year, Pierre Chandon, a L’Oréal chaired professor of marketing, innovation and creativity at INSEAD in France, and Yann Cornil, a doctoral student, conducted a study examining exactly that: the correlation of eating habits with the result of your favorite football team on any given Sunday.

The results showed that watching your team suffer defeat does indeed turn you into an unhealthier eater than if you had watched your team win.

"For many people, being a supporter of a football team is an important part of their identity. In fact, fans don’t say ‘they lost’ or ‘they won’ but ‘we lost’ or ‘we won.’ When our favorite team win, we feel good, we feel strong, and it’s easier to make healthier food choices," Chandon told Mic in a phone interview. “It’s a bit like when we are in love, we are no longer that hungry. When our team loses however, we feel weak, and it becomes more difficult to resist the comfort of indulgent food.”

The study looked at two seasons’ worth of NFL games and the consumption habits of people in the 30 NFL cities in North America. The results were compared against control groups, people in cities where matches did not take place on the same day or people who did not have a home NFL team to root for. On average, Americans eat 16% more saturated fat and 10% more calories the day after their NFL team suffers a loss. In contrast, the day after a team wins, its fans ate 9% less saturated fat and 5% fewer calories. The results were consistent across genders.


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